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Cancer Care Specialty Updates

April 2018

Trial of supplemental field therapy for advanced NCLC

A multisite, phase III trial testing electric field therapy in patients with brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer is enrolling patients at University of Minnesota Health locations. Patients will receive either radiosurgery alone or radiosurgery with tumor-treating electric fields. The alternating electric fields target metastases and have been used successfully in treating other cancers. Emil Lou, MD, is the site principal investigator. For information, contact ksieczko@umn.edu or colem258@umn.edu.

New thoracic surgeon joins Cancer Care team

Amit Bhargava, MDAmit Bhargava, MD, has joined University of Minnesota Health Cancer Care and will see patients primarily at Ridges Cancer Clinic and perform surgeries at Fairview Ridges Hospital in Burnsville and at University of Minnesota Medical Center. He is also available for appointments at the Masonic Cancer Clinic in the Clinics and Surgery Center. He received his medical degree from the University of Wisconsin Medical School and trained in general surgery at New York Presbyterian Weill Cornell Medical Center. He completed a residency in cardiothoracic surgery and a fellowship in advanced minimally invasive thoracic procedures at the University of Pittsburgh. Bhargava is certified by the American Board of Thoracic Surgery and American Board of Surgery. Previously, he practiced at Montefiore Medical Center in New York. He offers a range of thoracic surgical services, including lung resection and surgery for benign esophageal diseases.

Chemoprevention trial tests impact of glucobrassicin

A new clinical trial is testing the potential of food-based approaches to tobacco-related cancer. The study will test the activity of glucobrassicin, a glucosinolate found in Brussels sprouts, on the metabolism of labeled phenanthrene, a chemical component of cigarette smoke. Cruciferous vegetables, including Brussels sprouts, contain glucosinolates, which are being investigated for their anticancer properties. Participants will eat Brussels sprouts once a day for seven consecutive days and have their urine analyzed for phenanthrene metabolites. Naomi Fujioka, MD, is the principal investigator

Stereotactic radiotherapy system available for cancer patients

Stereotactic body radiation therapy is now available for cancer patients at University of Minnesota Health Cancer Care locations in Minneapolis and Maple Grove. The Truebeam® Radiotherapy system employs an adjustable patient positioning platform and computer imaging to guide delivery of high doses of radiotherapy to malignancies and minimize exposure to nontarget tissue. The system’s computer-integration allows for enhanced safety, reduced operating times, and upgradable systems.

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April 2018

New Therapies and Screening Efforts Improve Lung Cancer Outcomes

Screening at-risk patients can reduce lung cancer mortality by 20%. Immunotherapy such as with checkpoint inhibitors has also shown promise in improving outcomes for some patients with late-stage disease.

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April 2018

Repeat Nivolumab Achieves Near-Complete Lung Cancer Symptom Resolution

After initial treatments produced no effect, repeat nivolumab therapy results in a decrease in hilar adenopathy and a reduction of symptoms for a patient with stage IIIA adenocarcinoma.

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