Clinician-to-Clinician Update Clinician-to-Clinician Update

Heart Care Specialty Updates

February 2017

Ranking for heart failure care among best in nation

Three hospitals offering C.O.R.E. Clinic services have earned a high performing rating in heart failure care from U.S. News & World Report in its 2016-2017 rankings. The score places them among the top 10% of those evaluated. The recognized hospitals—University of Minnesota Medical Center, Fairview Southdale, and Fairview Ridges—include the C.O.R.E. Clinic’s specialists and its coordinated medical, educational, and support services as part of their overall heart failure care offerings. It is not the first recognition for the hospitals’ performance in heart failure. All have earned the Gold Plus Award from the American Heart Association Get with the Guidelines program for the past 3 years. More information on the U.S. News & World Report ranking can be found at http://health.usnews.com/best-hospitals.

Clinic betters national averages for CHF outcomes

Thirty-day hospital readmission rates for chronic heart failure patients in C.O.R.E. Clinic locations run consistently below the observed to expected ratio for readmissions, at about 0.8, report the clinic’s cardiologists. Nationwide the hospital readmission rate for patients admitted for primary heart failure at least once within the previous 30 days is 24%.1 Recent data place readmission rates at C.O.R.E. Clinic locations at 17%. The observed to expected ratio for mortality for heart failure patients in the C.O.R.E program is 0.6, while nationally it is 1.0.1 Patients with the most advanced cases of heart failure have the highest risk of being readmitted to the hospital, making these metrics significant in measuring outpatient heart failure program success. Effective ambulatory care programs have also been presented as an important means to preventing heart failure re-admission rates.

References

  1. Mozaffarian D, Benjamin EJ, Go AS, et al. Heart disease and stroke statistics—2016 update: a report from the American Heart Association. Circulation. 2016;133:e38-e360.
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